Link Between Too Much TV And Future Fast-Food Intake

January 30, 2009 at 11:00 am Leave a comment


High-school kids who watch too much TV are likely to have bad eating habits five years in the future. Research published in BioMed Central’s open access International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity followed almost 2000 high- and middle-school children and found that TV viewing times predict a poor diet in the future.





Dr Daheia Barr-Anderson worked with a team of researchers from the University of Minnesota to investigate the relationship between television and diet. She said, “To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the association between television viewing and diet over the transition from adolescence into young adulthood. We’ve shown that TV viewing during adolescence predicts poorer dietary intake patterns five years later”.





Stronger and more consistent patterns were seen during the transition from high school to young adulthood than during the transition from middle school to high school. Both are critical developmental periods, where lifelong behaviours are formed. The authors found that those high-school kids who watched more than five hours of television per day had a lower intake of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and calcium-rich foods; and higher intakes of snack foods, fried foods, fast food, sugar-sweetened beverages, and trans fats five years later. According to Barr-Anderson, “These less than healthy foodstuffs are commonly advertised on television while healthy foods rarely receive the same publicity. Although young people may be aware that many foods advertised on television are not healthy, they may chose to ignore or do not fully realize the consequences, because the actors they see advertising and eating the foods in the commercials are usually not overweight”.





Barr-Anderson and her colleagues have called for action to tackle television adverts for food and drinks. They say, “The potential negative impacts of advertising and marketing campaigns on dietary quality and purchasing behavior show that, as well as devising interventions to reduce television viewing time, we need to promote healthy food choices, in general and while watching television, to overcome harmful media influences”.





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Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release.

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Notes





1. Does television viewing predict dietary intake five years later in high school students and young adults?


Daheia J Barr-Anderson, Nicole I Larson, Melissa C Nelson, Dianne Neumark-Sztainer and Mary Story

International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (in press)


Article available at journal website: http://www.ijbnpa.org/


All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central’s open access policy.





2. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (IJBNPA) is an Open Access, peer-reviewed online journal devoted to furthering the understanding of the behavioral aspects of diet and physical activity. IJBNPA is unique in its focus on the behavioral aspects of diet and physical activity; its inclusion of multiple levels of analysis, including populations, groups and individuals; and its inclusion of epidemiology, and behavioral, theoretical and measurement research areas.





3. BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com/) is an STM (Science, Technology and Medicine) publisher which has pioneered the open access publishing model. All peer-reviewed research articles published by BioMed Central are made immediately and freely accessible online, and are licensed to allow redistribution and reuse. BioMed Central is part of Springer Science+Business Media, a leading global publisher in the STM sector.





Source: Graeme Baldwin


BioMed Central

[Via http://www.medicalnewstoday.com]

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